Spring Break Health Tips

spring breakIt’s that time of the year when millions of high school and college students are planning a long-time tradition-spring break. Although it is a time for friends and fun, it is also a time that can quickly take a turn for the worse. If you are planning a spring break trip, one of the most important things to add to your “trip list” is spring break safety. Here are a few tips to help you have a safe and enjoyable spring break.

Limit Alcohol Consumption

If you are of legal drinking age and you are planning to include drinking alcohol as part of your spring break, it is extremely important to keep in mind that alcohol can impair your actions and your judgment. Every 31 minutes someone dies in an alcohol related motor vehicle crash and non-fatal injuries occur every two minutes as a result of motor alcohol related accidents, so don’t drink and drive. There are plenty of tasty non-alcoholic alternatives, so choose your beverages with safety in mind.

Protect Skin from the Sun

After a cold, snowy winter, it can be extremely tempting to stay out in the warm sun longer than what you should. Although getting some sun can be beneficial for you, excessive and unprotected sun exposure can lead to changes in your skin texture, premature aging and even skin cancer. Remember to always wear sunscreen and reapply after getting in the water. The ideal sunscreen is one with an SPF of 15. Protect your eyes from the sun by wearing wrap-around sunglasses that provide 100% UV ray protection.

Drink Water & Eat Healthy

It requires a lot of fuel and energy to have fun, so be sure to eat a variety of healthy foods, including plenty of fruits and vegetables. It’s also recommended that you include lean meats, fish, poultry and low-fat dairy products in your diet. Be sure to drink plenty of water and try to limit the amount of salt, sugar and saturated fat you eat.

Stay Active

If you’re like most high school and college students, the winter months typically include a lot of sitting in class working on the computer and studying, so during your spring break take an opportunity to start a fitness program. While you’re away on break, participate in a variety of fun activities, such as dancing, playing volleyball, swimming and walking. Remember activity doesn’t have to been strenuous to be beneficial. Part of spring break safety is to avoid getting an injury so, start all new activities slowly and try to include activities that help to increase your breathing and heart rate as well as strengthen your muscles.

Surepoint Emergency Center is open 24 hours a day and is located at I-35E and Loop 288 on the east side of the highway. At Surepoint, you are seen by a doctor within 5 minutes of your arrival. No waiting in the hospital emergency room waiting when you are sick.

Men’s Heart Health

heart healthHeart disease is the most common cause of death for men in the United States. Heart disease is a term that is used to describe any disorder of the cardiovascular system, which affects your heart’s ability to function correctly. It is basically an “umbrella” term to that includes coronary artery disease, heart failure, angina, arrhythmias and other heart related irregularities and infections. When it comes to heart health, there is never a right or wrong age to start taking care of your heart. Here are a few men’s healthy heart tips to help keep your heart healthy at any age.

Eat a Healthy Diet

One of the most important things that improve men’s heart health is by making smart food choices. Regardless of your age, everyone can benefit from a healthy diet-the food you eat can help to decrease your risk of heart disease and stroke. As part of a healthy diet, choose foods that are low in saturated trans fat and sodium and limit your calories by filling up on high-fiber foods, such as fruits, vegetables and whole grains. A healthy diet includes limiting sugar-sweetened beverages and eating less fatty meals and more fish, nuts and skinless poultry.

Be Physically Active

Although it’s often easier to be and stay active if you start at a young age; getting physically active is possible at any age. Try to aim for a goal of 30-60 minutes of regular, aerobic exercise for 4-5 days a week. Simple activities, such as walking, biking or jogging are excellent forms of exercise for men’s heart health. The ultimate goal is to additional include two days a week for muscle-strengthening activities that will work on all of the major muscle groups (back, legs, hips, chest, shoulders, abdomen and arms).

Have Regular Wellness Exams

One of the most important things you can do for your heart as well as your overall general health is find a doctor and have regular wellness examinations. It is essential to talk to your physician about your eating habits, lifestyle habits and checking your heart rate, blood pressure and body mass index. The earlier you know where you stand with your numbers, the easier it makes it to identify any possible changes in the future.

Although it seems that something as serious as a heart attack should have warning signs, it is possible to develop cardiovascular disease without knowing it, so it is never too early or too late to learn the warning signs of a heart attack. Although the most common sign of a heart attack in men is chest pain and discomfort, not everyone that has a heart attack will suddenly experience severe chest pain. It is possible to have discomfort that isn’t necessarily painful in areas of your body, such as your jaw, abdomen, arms, neck or back. During a heart attack you may also have nausea, shortness of breath, profuse sweating and/or lightheadedness. Getting smart about men’s heart health early on will put you way ahead of the curve-the things you do and the things you don’t do are the tell-tale signs of a healthy future.

Surepoint Emergency Center is open 24 hours a day and is located at I-35E and Loop 288 on the east side of the highway.  At Surepoint, you are seen by a doctor within 5 minutes of your arrival. No waiting in the hospital emergency room waiting when you are sick.

Sugar Awareness Week: Making Some Positive Changes

sugar awarenessShould I Take The Sugar Awareness Challenge?

Perhaps the thought of living one day without any sugar panics you? After all, sweetness is genetically ingrained in humans at birth to encourage healthy nursing. Sweet sensing taste buds are the first to develop in infants. Often, we use sugar sweets like ice cream, cake, cookies, pie or our favorite candies as rewards for completing a hard assignment or just surviving a difficult day. Yes, you are the perfect candidate who will benefit from sugar awareness.

The truth is, “The Sugar Awareness Challenge” is pretty easy. Eliminating foods prepared with refined sugar and Aspartame for just five days isn’t as hard as you might think, and the results are insights on how you can control your sugar intake and quickly feel much better.

Sugar is the culprit that impairs learning and memory. In fact, it doesn’t cause hyperactivity, but you will experience sugar crashes, sluggishness, even mood swings after binging on treats. Now that the holidays have passed, it would be the perfect time to take the Sugar Awareness Quiz and experiment with journaling how you feel for five days.

Starting a Family Challenge

Bad habits can follow us through-out our lives, but so will Good Habits. Working together to help each other get through the day without sugar binges will improve your family dynamics and make you all aware of how sugar effects mood, energy, and even memory. If you can’t bear to throw away your sugar and sugary foods, store them in a locked box until the sugar awareness challenge is over. During the five days, everyone share what each day was like.

Surepoint Emergency Center is open 24 hours a day and is located at I-35E and Loop 288 on the east side of the highway. At Surepoint, you’re seen by a doctor within 5 minutes of your arrival. No waiting in a hospital emergency room when you are sick.